Sunday, August 15, 2021

Apache NetBeans 12.5

Apache NetBeans 12.5 - beta 1 is available for testing.  Please download it and give it a try at:

https://ci-builds.apache.org/job/Netbeans/job/netbeans-TLP/job/netbeans/job/release125/lastSuccessfulBuild/artifact/dist/netbeans/

New features in this release are listed at the following link:  https://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/NETBEANS/Apache+NetBeans+12.5






Saturday, October 24, 2020

Kicking the Tires of Jakarta EE 9 with Payara

We've been hearing all about it.  Jakarta EE 9 will be released in November 2020.  The Jakarta EE working group and community have been working hard to bring this release to the masses, and it is about ready.  Here's how to take a look at it today, using one of the most popular application server containers.

1.  Download the latest Payara Server Community 5.2020.5 release, which includes "Tech Preview" support for Jakarta EE 9.  https://www.payara.fish/downloads/#community

2.  Create a simple service using Jakarta EE APIs, adding the jakarta.platform:jakartaee.jakarta.jakartaee-api:9.0.0-RC3 dependency. 

3.  Build and deploy the service to Payara Server Community 5.2020.5.

That's it.  The Payara Server Community edition includes an Eclipse Transformer Configuration Option, which will automatically detect jakarta.* package references during the deployment of the application, and transform the class and resource files from the jakarta.* namespace to javax.*.  Take a look at this Payara blog post for more info:  https://blog.payara.fish/eclipse-transformer-configuration

Example POM including Payara Server Community Support:


<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
         xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <groupId>com.employeeevent</groupId>
    <artifactId>AcmeChat</artifactId>
    <version>1.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>war</packaging>
    <name>AcmeChat-1.0-SNAPSHOT</name>
    
    <properties>
        <maven.compiler.source>1.8</maven.compiler.source>
        <maven.compiler.target>1.8</maven.compiler.target>
        <endorsed.dir>${project.build.directory}/endorsed</endorsed.dir>
        <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
        <failOnMissingWebXml>false</failOnMissingWebXml>
        <jakartaee>9.0.0-RC3</jakartaee>
    </properties>
    
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>jakarta.platform</groupId>
            <artifactId>jakarta.jakartaee-api</artifactId>
            <version>${jakartaee}</version>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>
    
    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>3.1</version>
                <configuration>
                    <source>1.8</source>
                    <target>1.8</target>
                    <compilerArguments>
                        <endorseddirs>${endorsed.dir}</endorseddirs>
                    </compilerArguments>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3</version>
                <configuration>
                    <failOnMissingWebXml>false</failOnMissingWebXml>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-dependency-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.6</version>
                <executions>
                    <execution>
                        <phase>validate</phase>
                        <goals>
                            <goal>copy</goal>
                        </goals>
                        <configuration>
                            <outputDirectory>${endorsed.dir}</outputDirectory>
                            <silent>true</silent>
                            <artifactItems>
                                <artifactItem>
                                    <groupId>jakarta.platform</groupId>
                                    <artifactId>jakarta.jakartaee-api</artifactId>
                                    <version>${jakartaee}</version>
                                    <type>pom</type>
                                </artifactItem>
                            </artifactItems>
                        </configuration>
                    </execution>
                </executions>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
</project>

Tuesday, September 08, 2020

Developing a Simple Service with Spring Boot

In this post, I will demonstrate how to create a simple web service using Spring Boot.  This framework makes it almost effortless to develop web services, so long as the appropriate dependencies are in-place.  In this example, I will create a web service that will read the current temperature from a file and make it available to clients via a RESTful endpoint.

The Spring Initializr helps one to choose the dependencies that are required for production a particular solution.  The Initializr can be found at: https://start.spring.io/  

The first thing to note when creating a project using the Initializr is that one can develop Spring Boot applications using a number of different JVM languages, including Java, Kotlin, or Groovy.  This is one area where Spring Boot differs from Jakarta EE, which is primarily focused on the Java language.  One also has the option to choose either Gradle or Maven for their Spring Boot project.  Perhaps one of the most tedious parts of using the Initialzr to create a project is choosing the appropriate dependencies for the project.  The reason being that there are so many dependency options, it can take a while to learn which are the most useful for a particular solution.  This is not a bad thing...it is just something that needs to be learned over time.

To get started, choose the following options within the Initializr:

Project: Maven

Language: Java

Spring Boot: 2.3.3

Dependencies:  Spring Web

Project Metadata

- Group:  org.demo

- Artifact: poolservice

- Name: poolservice

- Package Name:  org.demo.poolservice

- Packaging:  WAR

- Java:  11

Once these options are chosen, click "Generate" to download the project files.  Once downloaded, open the project in your favorite IDE.  In this case, I will be using Apache NetBeans 12.  The project can now be built and deployed to a container, such as Payara server.  The project comes configured and ready to begin adding RESTful services.  The following code shows the generated PoolserviceApplication class, which was created by the Initializr, contains the @SpringBootApplication annotation.  

package org.demo.poolservice;

import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;

@SpringBootApplication
public class PoolserviceApplication {

	public static void main(String[] args) {
		SpringApplication.run(PoolserviceApplication.class, args);
	}

}

The @SpringBootApplication annotation is a shortcut annotation that combines the default functionality of the following three annotations:

  • @EnableAutoConfiguration: enables Spring Boot auto-configuration
  • @ComponentScan: enables component scanning on the package where application is loaded
  • @Configuration: allows registration of extra beans in the context or the ability to import additional configuration classes

Since the application is configured by default, generate a new RESTful service by creating a class named HelloController in the same package and placing the following code into it:

package org.demo.poolservice;

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;

@RestController
public class HelloController {

	@RequestMapping("/")
	public String index() {
		return "Greetings from Spring Boot This is the main service!";
	}

}

The @RestController annotation wires the class up as a RESTful web service controller by combining the traditional @Controller and @ResponseBody annotation functionality. In this example, I am using the request root to serve the response, as the @RequestMapping annotation indicates. Once this controller class has been added and the code has been compiled and redeployed, the URL http://localhost:8080/poolservice can be visited to display the message: "Greetings from Spring Boot This is the main service!".

It is time to add the functionality for reading the current temperature from a text file (written by a Raspberry Pi) by creating a new class named TemperatureReader. This class can be made a contextual bean by annotating it with @Component and specifying a name by which the bean will be referenced.  In this case, "temperatureReader".  The functionality of the class is very simple, as it reads temperatures from a file that are in the format: (23.5, 78.3), and makes them accessible via currentTemperatureC and currentTemperatureF, respectively.

package org.demo.poolservice;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.charset.Charset;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;


@Component("temperatureReader")
public class TemperatureReader {
    
    private String currentTemperatureF;
    
    private String currentTemperatureC;
    
    protected String readTemperatureFile() {
        
        
        String temperatureFile = "/<>/temperature.txt";
        System.out.println("Temperature File: " + temperatureFile);
        java.nio.file.Path path = Paths.get(temperatureFile);
        String currentTemperature = null;
        try (BufferedReader reader = Files.newBufferedReader(path, Charset.forName("UTF-8"))) {

            String currentLine = null;
            while ((currentLine = reader.readLine()) != null) {//while there is content on the current line
                currentTemperature = currentLine;
            }
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace(); //handle an exception here
        }
        return currentTemperature;
    }

    /**
     * @return the currentTemperatureF
     */
    public String getCurrentTemperatureF() {
        String temp = readTemperatureFile();
        currentTemperatureF = temp.substring(temp.indexOf(",") + 1, temp.lastIndexOf(")"));
        return currentTemperatureF;
    }

    /**
     * @param currentTemperatureF the currentTemperatureF to set
     */
    public void setCurrentTemperatureF(String currentTemperatureF) {
        this.currentTemperatureF = currentTemperatureF;
    }

    /**
     * @return the currentTemperatureC
     */
    public String getCurrentTemperatureC() {
        String temp = readTemperatureFile();
        currentTemperatureC = temp.substring(temp.indexOf("(") + 1, temp.lastIndexOf(","));
        return currentTemperatureC;
    }

    /**
     * @param currentTemperatureC the currentTemperatureC to set
     */
    public void setCurrentTemperatureC(String currentTemperatureC) {
        this.currentTemperatureC = currentTemperatureC;
    }
    
}

Finally, to make the temperature readings available via a RESTFul service, create a controller named TemperatureController and annotate it with @RestController. Inject the TemperatureReader by annotating a private TemperatureReader field with @Autowired. The bean can then be used to obtain the temperature via the use of the TemperatureReader field. The URL mapping for the service is supplied via the @RequestMapping("/temperature") annotation on the index() method, which will be used to serve up the temperature at the respective request mapping. The functionality contained within the index() method is very minimal, as it merely calls upon the temperatureReader.getCurrentTemperatureF() method to return the current temperature in Fahrenheit.

package org.demo.poolservice;

import org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;


@RestController
public class TemperatureController {
    
    @Autowired
    private TemperatureReader temperatureReader;
    
    @RequestMapping("/temperature")
	public String index() {
            return temperatureReader.getCurrentTemperatureF();
	}
    
}
To see the temperature, visit the URL: http://localhost:8080/poolservice/temperature

Sunday, August 23, 2020

Developing Web & Enterprise Applications for the JVM - "This and That"

I am starting a new series of blog posts which will cover the ins and outs, tips and tricks of developing web and enterprise applications with Java.  Some people refer to enterprise meaning that an application requires interaction with a database and/or communication with other applications and services.  Therefore, this blog series will apply to "Web" or "Enterprise" application development for the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) using a number of different technologies.

In this blog series, I will not focus on any single strategy or API, but rather, I will cover a number of technical strategies and options that can be used for developing applications for deployment on the JVM.  The main goal is to provide readers with a broad overview of the ecosystem available for the JVM, ensuring that one knows various paths that can be followed to develop sophisticated applications.  I also hope to keep each post short and to the point, to allow one more time to develop and experiment, rather than reading my ramblings.  

There is no doubt that the JVM is one of the key technologies of our time, as it is installed on millions of devices worldwide, and tens of thousands of applications have been written for the JVM.  Even though it is one of the most popular platforms for application development, there tends to be questioning on which path to take when developing certain applications.  I like to think of the myriad of options as "tools" that are in the toolshed.  We can utilize a Phillips screwdriver to tighten an Allen wrench screw, but it certainly may not be the optimal choice and there are more suitable options available.  Much in the same manner, one may use Jakarta EE to develop a microservice just because he or she may know that tech, but there may be better options out there for the particular solution at hand.

Hopefully this blog series will provide you with a better understanding of which tool to choose for your future projects.  Just because you know one technology very well, it does not mean that you cannot pick up another technology easily enough and make your toolshed even more substantial for future endeavors.  One should continually learn new technologies so that they are not locked into using a single strategy.

To that end...I will start this series by showing how to develop a very simple web service which will be used to provide a temperature reading.  The web service end point can be harnessed by clients to obtain the current temperature by reading a file that has been written by a temperature sensor connected to a raspberry pi.  In the first post, I will utilize Jakarta EE 8 to build this service.  

Note:  As you read on in this series, you will see that version numbers of APIs mean the world.  As with any technology, web and enterprise development are ever-changing, and so moving from one version to the next usually means that there may be a number of changes in the way a service or application needs to be developed.  

The following index will be updated to include posts as they are written for inclusion in this series.


Developing a Simple Web Service with Jakarta EE 8

For context, Jakarta EE 8 is very much the same as Java EE 6 through Java EE 8.  The main differences between Java EE 6 and Jakarta EE 8 are the inclusion of newer specifications and updated technologies that had been added over the years.  Moreover, Jakarta EE 8 is an open source platform, whereas Java EE was not open source.  When Oracle open sourced Java EE to the Eclipse Foundation, it became known as Jakarta EE.

This example application (web service) will create a WAR file which can be deployed to any Jakarta EE 8-compliant application server container.  This includes micro-containers such as Payara Micro or WildFly.  To begin, create a Maven based WAR file project in your favorite Integrated Development Environment (IDE).  The most prevalent IDE's for developing Jakarta EE 8 applications include Eclipse, IntelliJ, or Apache NetBeans.  Another option is to download the Jakarta EE starter project.  In this post, I start with the Jakarta EE starter project and then I will open and develop within Apache NetBeans 12.  I will deploy to Payara Micro.

To get started, grab a copy of the Jakarta EE starter project simple-hello and copy it into a working directory on your machine.  Open the project in your IDE and rename it to PoolService-1.0-SNAPSHOT, as seen in Figure 1.
Figure 1:  Rename Project

Modify the class named org.demo.simple.ApplicationConfig, by adding a path. Once finished, it should look as follows:

package com.demo.simple;

import javax.ws.rs.ApplicationPath;
import javax.ws.rs.core.Application;

/**
 * Configures the Jakarta REST application.
 * 
 * @author Ivar Grimstad (ivar.grimstad@eclipse-foundation.org)
 */
@ApplicationPath("resources")
public class ApplicationConfig extends Application {
    
}
This will create a root path for your Jakarta RESTful web services at the path "resources", meaning that in order to access any JAX-RS resources, preface the service name with this path.

Next, develop a controller class that can be utilized for reading the temperature file when invoked.  Create a new Java class named org.demo.simple.TemperatureController, which is responsible for reading the file and setting values within variables.  The temperature will be in the format (23.5, 74.3) with the first reading being in Celsius, and the second reading being in Fahrenheit. 

package com.demo.simple;

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.charset.Charset;
import java.nio.file.Files;
import java.nio.file.Paths;
import javax.enterprise.context.RequestScoped;
import javax.inject.Named;

/**
 *
 * @author juneau
 */
@Named
@RequestScoped
public class TemperatureController {
    
    private String currentTemperatureF;
    
    private String currentTemperatureC;
    
    public TemperatureController(){
        
    }
    
    protected String readTemperatureFile() {
        
        String temperatureFile = "<<path-to-file>>/temperature.txt";
        java.nio.file.Path path = Paths.get(temperatureFile);
        String currentTemperature = null;
        try (BufferedReader reader = Files.newBufferedReader(path, Charset.forName("UTF-8"))) {

            String currentLine = null;
            while ((currentLine = reader.readLine()) != null) {//while there is content on the current line
                currentTemperature = currentLine;
            }
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace(); //handle an exception here
        }
        return currentTemperature;
    }

    /**
     * @return the currentTemperatureF
     */
    public String getCurrentTemperatureF() {
        String temp = readTemperatureFile();
        currentTemperatureF = temp.substring(temp.indexOf(",") + 1, temp.lastIndexOf(")"));
        return currentTemperatureF;
    }

    /**
     * @param currentTemperatureF the currentTemperatureF to set
     */
    public void setCurrentTemperatureF(String currentTemperatureF) {
        this.currentTemperatureF = currentTemperatureF;
    }

    /**
     * @return the currentTemperatureC
     */
    public String getCurrentTemperatureC() {
        String temp = readTemperatureFile();
        currentTemperatureC = temp.substring(temp.indexOf("(") + 1, temp.lastIndexOf(","));
        return currentTemperatureC;
    }

    /**
     * @param currentTemperatureC the currentTemperatureC to set
     */
    public void setCurrentTemperatureC(String currentTemperatureC) {
        this.currentTemperatureC = currentTemperatureC;
    }
    
}

An interested service can now inject TemperatureController using Contexts and Dependency Injection (CDI), and call upon getCurrentTemperatureF() or getCurrentTemperatureC() in order to obtain the requested temperature format.  As such, lastly create a Jakarta Restful Web Services file named TemperatureResource, and enter the following code:

package com.demo.simple;

import javax.ws.rs.core.Context;
import javax.ws.rs.core.UriInfo;
import javax.ws.rs.Consumes;
import javax.ws.rs.Produces;
import javax.ws.rs.GET;
import javax.ws.rs.Path;
import javax.ws.rs.PUT;
import javax.enterprise.context.RequestScoped;
import javax.inject.Inject;
import javax.ws.rs.core.MediaType;

/**
 * JAX-RS Web Service
 *
 * @author juneau
 */
@Path("temperature")
@RequestScoped
public class TemperatureResource {
    
    @Inject
    private TemperatureController temperatureController;

    /**
     * Creates a new instance of TemperatureResource
     */
    public TemperatureResource() {
    }

    /**
     * Calls upon the TemperatureController and obtains the current temperature
     * in Fahrenheit.
     *
     * @return an instance of java.lang.String
     */
    @GET
    @Produces({MediaType.TEXT_PLAIN})
    public String getXml() {
        String currentTemperature = temperatureController.getCurrentTemperatureF();
        return currentTemperature;
    }

    /**
     * PUT method for updating or creating an instance of TemperatureResource
     *
     * @param content representation for the resource
     */
    @PUT
    @Consumes(MediaType.APPLICATION_XML)
    public void putXml(String content) {
    }
    
    /**
     * Calls upon the TemperatureController and retrieves the current temperature
     * in Fahrenheit.  Same as getXml();
     * @return 
     */
    @GET
    @Produces({MediaType.TEXT_PLAIN, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON})
    @Path("f")
    public String getF() {
        String currentTemperature = temperatureController.getCurrentTemperatureF();
        return currentTemperature;
    }

    /**
     * Calls upon the TemperatureController and retrieves the current temperature
     * in Celsius.
     * @return 
     */
    @GET
    @Produces({MediaType.TEXT_PLAIN, MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON})
    @Path("c")
    public String getC() {
        String currentTemperature = temperatureController.getCurrentTemperatureC();
        return currentTemperature;
    }
    
}

This is a web service that will be made available at the URI /resources/temperature, so when the URL http://localhost:8080/poolService/resources/temperature is entered, then the temperature in Fahrenheit should be displayed. This happens because the method named getXml() is called by default since it is annotated with @GET and does not contain a path. It will return plain text since it is annotated with @Produces({MediaType.TEXT_PLAIN}). If I wish to change the default format to something else, say XML, then I could modify the @Produces annotation to: @Produces({MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON}).  The getXml() method invokes the TemperatureController getCurrentTemperatureF() method to read the temperature and return the result.

Use your favorite IDE or the command line to compile and build the project to create a WAR (Web Archive) file named simple-hello.war.
 

Deployment

I am going to use a micro container to deploy the application.  However, it could also be deployed into any other Jakarta EE compatible container such as GlassFish, Payara, or Open Liberty.  See the following link for compatible implementations:  https://jakarta.ee/compatibility/

In this case, download Payara Micro 5.2020.4 and place the downloaded JAR file into a directory.  Next, open a terminal and type in the following to start Payara Micro and deploy the WAR file:

java -jar payara-micro-5.2020.4.jar --deploy <path-to-war-file>/simple-hello.war

This will start the server and output something similar to the following in the terminal:
Payara Micro URLs:
http://<your-machine>:8080/simple-hello

'simple-hello' REST Endpoints:
GET	/simple-hello/resources/application.wadl
GET	/simple-hello/resources/hello
GET	/simple-hello/resources/temperature
PUT	/simple-hello/resources/temperature
GET	/simple-hello/resources/temperature/c
GET	/simple-hello/resources/temperature/f

]]
Input the following URL into the browser to run the service:  http://<your-machine>:8080/simple-hello/resources/temperature

Thursday, November 28, 2019

Jakarta EE Contribution - Getting Started

Are you interested in helping out with moving Jakarta EE forward?  So am I, and I wanted to provide a few details that can be used to help those who are interested in getting started.

Step 1:

The first step to begin contributing is to sign the Eclipse Foundation Committer and Contributor Agreement (ECA):  https://www.eclipse.org/legal/committer_process/re-sign/. The ECA must be signed by anyone who wants to contribute to an Eclipse open source software or specification project.  This allows one to have the ability to accept a contributor's pull requests.  

The Eclipse ICA (Eclipse Individual Committer Agreement) can be signed by those who do not work for the Eclipse Foundation Member Company when they become a committer.

** Note:  Be sure that your employer is okay with you signing the agreement.  In many cases it is a win-win for all...as your contributions will benefit the community, including your employer.

Step 2:

Sign up for the mailing lists and get involved.  Certainly sign up for the Jakarta Platform Developer mailing list, as many of the details for moving the platform forward are being discussed here.


Look through the list of projects that are part of Jakarta EE and sign up for the individual mailing lists for those projects which you are interested in helping out: https://projects.eclipse.org/projects/ee4j


A few of the tasks for the delivery of Jakarta EE 9 include the following:

* Take control of the CI/CD pipeline for release.
* Coordinate release across all the projects.
* Make the actual changes to the API, docs and TCK.
* Make the implementation changes on at least one server - probably Eclipse GlassFish.


Hopefully this will be of use to hose who are interested in getting started.  

Monday, November 26, 2018

Automating Docker Deployments Using Jib and Payara Micro

If you are like me, you spend most of your day developing applications.  During that time, it is difficult to carve out the time to manage containers.  Writing a Dockerfile has almost become part of the normal development process nowadays, but there is a different way.  I'd rather spend as much time developing my applications as possible, and leave the Docker configuration as a minimal deployment procedure that is automatically completed for me.

I believe that the folks at Google were thinking in this way when they produced Jib.  The Jib project allows one to automate the creation of a Docker image so that the container can simply be started up after building the project.  There is no need to create a Dockerfile, as Jib takes care of this for you.  Jib works with both Maven and Gradle, and in this post I will demonstrate how to use it with Maven and deploy to Payara Micro.  By default, Jib includes a Jetty distribution to which an application will deployed inside of the container.  However, I am familiar with Payara Micro and quite enjoy the Payara Micro environment, so I'll bypass the use of Jetty and deploy to Payara Micro in this example.

To begin, it is important to get familiar with the Jib Maven process by reading through the documentation.

In this example I am utilizing the SportsTeamQueryService microservice that I produced for a Java Magazine article in 2018, but simply modifying the POM file to incorporate the Jib build.  I will not go into full detail on Jib in this post, as the documentation itself does quite well.  Rather, I will explain how I was able to get this project to build and deploy to Docker on my Mac.  If using a different OS, you may have to configure host-container networking in order for the container to communicate with the host database.

To begin, the POM file looks like the following, including only those dependencies that are required for the project.  I call your attention to the <plugins> section for the Jib hooks:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <groupId>org.javamagazine</groupId>
    <artifactId>SportsTeamQueryService</artifactId>
    <version>1.0</version>
    <packaging>war</packaging>

    <name>SportsTeamQueryService</name>

    <properties>
        <endorsed.dir>${project.build.directory}/endorsed</endorsed.dir>
        <project.build.sourceEncoding>UTF-8</project.build.sourceEncoding>
    </properties>
    
    <dependencies>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.persistence-api</artifactId>
            <version>2.2</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa</artifactId>
            <version>2.5.2</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.ws.rs</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.ws.rs-api</artifactId>
            <version>2.1</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.core</artifactId>
            <version>2.5.2</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>javax.ejb</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.ejb-api</artifactId>
            <version>3.2.2</version>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.asm</artifactId>
            <version>2.5.2</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.antlr</artifactId>
            <version>2.5.2</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.jpql</artifactId>
            <version>2.5.2</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>javax.persistence</artifactId>
            <version>2.1.0</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
        <dependency>
            <groupId>org.eclipse.persistence</groupId>
            <artifactId>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.modelgen.processor</artifactId>
            <version>2.5.2</version>
            <scope>provided</scope>
        </dependency>
    </dependencies>

    <build>
        <plugins>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>3.1</version>
                <configuration>
                    <source>1.8</source>
                    <target>1.8</target>
                    <compilerArguments>
                        <endorseddirs>${endorsed.dir}</endorseddirs>
                    </compilerArguments>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
            <plugin>
                <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
                <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>2.3</version>
                <configuration>
                    <failOnMissingWebXml>false</failOnMissingWebXml>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
            <!-- Docker JIB Dependency-->
            <plugin>
                <groupId>com.google.cloud.tools</groupId>
                <artifactId>jib-maven-plugin</artifactId>
                <version>0.10.0</version>
                <configuration>
                    <from>
                        <image>
                            payara/micro:latest
                        </image>
                    </from>
                    <to>
                        <image>sportsteamqueryservice</image>
                    </to>
                    <container>
                        <appRoot>/opt/payara/SportsTeamQueryService</appRoot>
                        <args>
                            <arg>
                                --addlibs
                            </arg>
                            <arg>
                                /jars/derbyclient.jar
                            </arg>
                            <arg>
                                --deploy
                            </arg>
                            <arg>
                                /opt/payara/SportsTeamQueryService
                            </arg>
                        </args>
                        <environment>                            
                            <DOCKER_HOST>docker.for.mac.localhost</DOCKER_HOST>
                            <DB_NAME>ACME</DB_NAME>
                            <DB_USER>acmeuser</DB_USER>
                            <DB_PASSWORD>password</DB_PASSWORD>
                        </environment>
                    </container>
                </configuration>
            </plugin>
        </plugins>
    </build>
    
</project>


In the POM, I added the Jib workflow within the <plugins> section.  In this project I utilized the latest Jib dependency at the time of writing, using the following maven coordinates:

<groupId>com.google.cloud.tools</groupId>
<artifactId>jib-maven-plugin</artifactId>
<version>0.10.0</version>

The <configuration> portion of the plugin specifies custom configuration for my project.  If I leave the <configuration> section off the declaration, then the WAR file generated by the project will be deployed to a Docker image containing a Jetty server.  The WAR file will be available at the Jetty ROOT.  Instead, since I am interested in using Payara Micro, I customized the Jib declaration as follows:

1)  Inherit FROM the latest hosted Payara Micro image using the <from><image> tags.

2)  Next, the <to><image> tags declare the name of the resulting Docker image.

3)  Add a <container> section to specify details about the container.
    a)  First, I added an <appRoot> tag to specify that the WAR file will be loaded into the "/opt/payara/" location, within the "SportsTeamQueryService" directory.

    b)  Next, I added a number of arguments by specifying <args><arg></arg></args>.

The first argument adds the Apache Derby Jar file to the deployment.  One note is that in the project itself, there is a "src/main/jib/jars" folder.  You must add the derbyclient.jar file inside of this "jib/jars" folder so that it is copied into the image.  By default, Jib adds anything within the "src/main/jib" folder into the project image.

The second argument specifies the Payara Micro "--deploy" argument and points to the "/opt/payara/SportsTeamQueryService" directory...which is the exploded WAR for the project.

    c)  Lastly, add the <environment> section to specify any environment variables that will be passed into the image.  In this case, I added database-specific environment variables.  If you take a look at the glassfish-resources.xml file within the project, you can see that these environment variables are referenced to configure the datasource.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE resources PUBLIC "-//GlassFish.org//DTD GlassFish Application Server 3.1 Resource Definitions//EN" "http://glassfish.org/dtds/glassfish-resources_1_5.dtd">
<resources>
    <jdbc-connection-pool ..abbreviated for brevity...>
        <property name="serverName" value="${ENV=DOCKER_HOST}"/>
        <property name="portNumber" value="1527"/>
        <property name="databaseName" value="${ENV=DB_NAME}"/>
        <property name="User" value="${ENV=DB_USER}"/>
        <property name="Password" value="${ENV=DB_PASSWORD}"/>
        <property name="URL" value="jdbc:derby://${ENV=DOCKER_HOST}:1527/acme"/>
        <property name="driverClass" value="org.apache.derby.jdbc.ClientDriver"/>
    </jdbc-connection-pool>
    <jdbc-resource enabled="true" jndi-name="java:app/jdbc/acme" object-type="user" pool-name="derby_net_acme_acmeuserPool"/>
</resources>

Note that you may need to modify the servername environment variable if not using Docker for Mac.

That is it for configuring Jib!  Now all that is required is simply to build the project and deploy the image to your local Docker repository.  In this case, I open the terminal and traverse inside of the SportsTeamQueryService-Jib project directory and issue the following Maven build:

mvn clean install

After the project has been built, invoke the Jib build by issuing the following:

mvn compile jib:dockerBuild

The Docker image should now be ready to start within the local Docker environment.  To start the container, issue the following:

docker run -d -p 8080:8080 sportsteamqueryservice

The container should now be up and running.  Visit the URL http://localhost:8080/SportsTeamQueryService/rest/teamrosterqueryservice/findAll to see the list of players. 

In order to rebuild the Docker image, simply issue the command:

mvn compile jib:dockerBuild

Project Sources:  https://github.com/juneau001/SportsTeamQueryService-Jib


Saturday, October 27, 2018

Oracle Code One...A Conference I'll Never Forget

In the spring of 2018 when Oracle Code One was first announced, I was fairly certain that I would not be attending this year.  The main reason is because I normally only attended the JavaOne conference every couple of years, and I thought this would be an "off" year.  Since I hadn't planned on attending, I did not submit any talks.  I was happy to be asked to join the "Content Selection Committee" for Oracle Code One, as I had been a member of the selection committee for a number of JavaOne conferences in the past.  I enjoy being part of the committee, as it is great to see the diversity of talks submitted to the conference each year.

As the conference was about a month out, I received a surprise email congratulating me on being a 2018 Duke's Choice Award winner.  I was flabbergasted, and in complete disbelief.  So much so, that I replied to the email and asked if the sender had the correct person, and why I had been chosen to win this award.  I received an email response confirming that I indeed did win, and I had been chosen as the "Java EE" winner this year.  During the nomination period for the Duke's Choice Award, I had nominated a couple of projects...but I couldn't believe that someone had nominated me.  Still in disbelief, I knew that this had certainly changed things, and I was no doubt going to attend the conference this year.

This was going to be a different type of conference, as I was not speaking for the first time at this conference in years.  Since I had no talks to prepare for, I signed up for a time slot in the Hackergarten on Tuesday.  My friend and podcast colleague Freddy Guime purchased recording equipment so I could get some interviews for the Java PubHouse and OffHeap podcasts...so I now had plenty of things to do while at the conference!  Luckily, I was able to have my wife attend the conference with me so that she could be there as I received this surprising Duke's Choice award.  

I was very lucky to have the opportunity to attend the Java Champions summit on Saturday before the conference.  It was great to meet up with old friends again and listen to some amazing speakers at the Java Champions summit.  There were talks covering: the new Java release cadence, Jakarta EE, MicroProfile, Machine Learning, OpenJFX, Java and Containers, Women In Tech, JUG Evolution in Latin America, and JCP EC Update.  Excellent speakers, great friends, and very awesome...especially because this was my first "JavaOne" (okay...Code One but JavaOne always holds a place in my heart) as a Java Champion...being that I was inducted into the program in March of 2017.

I spent Sunday with my wife visiting the sites of San Francisco.  We were lucky to have such great weather to see places like Chinatown and Fisherman's Wharf.  We attended the "Java in the Cloud" event at the Thirsty Bear that evening, and it was great to see even more familiar faces that evening.  It really is the networking at conferences such as Oracle Code One that makes the event. 

Monday was full of great sessions, as I started off right with attending a talk from Adam Bien on Jakarta EE.  As per his standard, the talk contained some live coding and excellent examples of how to package Java EE applications into Docker containers.  I also attended a talk on "Serverless" from Ivar Grimstad, which focused on writing serverless functions and deploying to different cloud solutions.  After these talks, I attended a "JUG Leaders and User Group Appreciation Luncheon" with several other esteemed Java community members.  I had the honor of attending to represent the Chicago Java User's Group (CJUG).  After lunch, I attended a talk on MicroProfile by Emily Jiang and Antoine Sabot-Durand...excellent session!  Other sessions and an excellent Java Keynote concluded my Monday at the conference.  I then headed out with my wife to the annual JCP party.  This event has become one of my favorite gatherings whenever I attended the conference, and this year was no different...a great time was had by all who attended.

Tuesday was full of more great sessions, and it was also award day!  I worked the Hackergarten in the morning, where I finished up some licensing reviews for Apache NetBeans enterprise modules, and worked on testing Mojarra 2.3.9.  This was an especially great day because I had learned on Monday that the Apache NetBeans community was going to be receiving the Duke's Choice Award this year also...so I had the very rare opportunity to celebrate the Duke's Choice Award with the NetBeans Community, as well as for "Java EE".  Prior to the award ceremony in the afternoon, I visited the Java Hub with my wife and we explored the great vendor booths and fun activities such as the Java Escape Rooms.  As we gathered in the afternoon for the award ceremony, I saw and congratulated other members of the Apache NetBeans team.  

The first Duke's Choice Award was presented to Apache NetBeans, and it was surreal as we community members went on stage to receive the award as a community.  Many other great projects won the award as well.  MicroProfile was then presented the award, and to my surprise it was being presented to me!  This was the award that I was emailed about a month earlier...it was not for "Java EE", but rather, it was for MicroProfile!  I was shocked, surprised, and truly honored to have the privilege to accept the Duke's Choice Award on behalf of the MicroProfile community!!  Luckily enough, my friend David Heffelfinger was in attendance for the Apache NetBeans award, so I was able to get a photo with the Duke's Choice Award with him, as he is another member of the Java EE and MicroProfile community.  I was glad to have the great privilege of taking a photo together with some members of the MicroProfile community later that evening after the MicroProfile BoF session.

As mentioned, I am truly honored for having the opportunity to receive the award on behalf of the MicroProfile community.  This community has done amazing things in a very short time.  There are so many esteemed members of the Java community that contribute to the MicroProfile project...and I only wish that I had known that the award was for MicroProfile so that I could have invited them all to attend the award event to celebrate as a community.  Regardless...the MicroProfile community has made a tremendous impact to enterprise Java, and every member of the community should be proud of this win!!  The Dukes Choice Award is the most highly regarded award in the Java Ecosystem...and MicroProfile has achieved this award in such a short time...it is amazing!
Photo:  Josh Juneau and David Heffelfinger

I spent much of my Wednesday attending other sessions and recording interviews for the Java PubHouse and OffHeap podcasts.  I was so lucky to have well known members of the Java Community take a few moments out of their day to give me insight to their conference experience.  I wish I had more time to meet with many others in the community...but time flies so fast at the conference that it seemed as though I never had a spare minute!


I mentioned before that the Java Community makes the conferences worth attending.  That is what it is all about!  I met so many old friends and made many new acquaintances.  Not only did I meet up with many amazing Java luminaries, but I was lucky enough to finally meet up with a fellow Apress author Alex Jecan and Apress editor Jonathan Gennick.  It was also great to meet up with so many others such as Oracle Java Magazine editor in chief Andrew Binstock.  

I also had the unique opportunity to be with the Apache NetBeans community to accept the 2018 Duke's Choice Award, and I had the honor of accepting the 2018 Duke's Choice Award on behalf of the MicroProfile community!  This will certainly be a conference that I will never forget.  I want to thank the folks are Oracle, including those that run the Java Champions program, and my organization for helping to make this year's trip to Oracle Code One possible for me. Thanks Oracle Code One for an amazing conference...and I look forward to attending again and meeting up with all of my friends in the amazing Java community!


Photo (left-to-right): John Clingan, Ken Finnigan, Mark Little, Ian Robinson, Reza Rahman, Emily Jiang, Josh Juneau